THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XVIII – The Death of Helga the Fair

AS time went on, Thorstein Egilson married his daughter Helga to a man called Thorkel, son of Hallkel, who lived west in Hraundale. Helga went to his house with him, but loved him little, for she cannot cease to think of Gunnlaug, though he be dead. Yet was Thorkel a doughty man, and wealthy of goods, and a good skald.

 

They had children together not a few, one of them was called Thorarin, another Thorstein, and yet more they had.

 

But Helga’s chief joy was to pluck at the threads of that cloak, Gunnlaug’s gift, and she would be ever gazing at it.

 

But on a time there came a great sickness to the house of Thorkel and Helga, and many were bed-ridden for a long time. Helga also fell sick, and yet she could not keep abed.

 

So one Saturday evening Helga sat in the fire-hall, and leaned her head upon her husband’s knees, and had the cloak Gunnlaug’s gift sent for; and when the cloak came to her she sat up and plucked at it, and gazed thereon awhile, and then sank back upon her husband’s bosom, and was dead. Then Thorkel sang this:—

 

“Dead in mine arms she droopeth,

My dear one, gold-rings bearer,

For God hath changed the life-days

Of this Lady of the linen.

Weary pain hath pined her,

But unto me, the seeker

Of hoard of fishes highway,

Abiding here is wearier.”

 

Helga was buried in the church there, but Thorke dwelt yet at Hraundale: but a great matter seemed the death of Helga to all, as was to be looked for.

AND HERE ENDETH

THE STORY

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

Download this saga as a PDF ebook from: http://www.abelapublishing.com/gunnlaug.html

 

A percentage of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to UNICEF.

 

The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm-Tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XVII – The News of the Fight brought to Iceland

Now this summer, before these tidings were brought out hither to Iceland, Illugi the Black, being at home at Gilsbank, dreamed a dream: he thought that Gunnlaug came to him in his sleep, all bloody, and he sang in the dream this stave before him; and Illugi remembered the song when he woke, and sang it before others:—

 

“Knew I of the hewing

Of Raven’s hilt-finned steel-fish

Byrny-shearing—sword-edge

Sharp clave leg of Raven.—

Of warm wounds drank the eagle,

When the war-rod slender,

Cleaver of the corpses,

Clave the head of Gunnlaug.”

 

This portent befel south at Mossfell, the self-same night, that Onund dreamed how Raven came to him, covered all over with blood, and sang:—

 

“Red is the sword, but I now

Am undone by Sword-Odin.

‘Gainst shields beyond the sea-flood

The ruin of shields was wielded.

Methinks the blood-fowl blood-stained

In blood der men’s heads stood there,

The wound-erne yet wound-eager

Trod over wounded bodies?”

 

Now the second summer after this, Illugi the Black spoke at the Althing from the Hill of Laws, and said:—

“Wherewith wilt thou make atonement to me for my son, whom Raven, thy son, beguiled in his troth?”

 

Onund answers, “Be it far from me to atone for him, so sorely as their meeting hath wounded me. Yet will I not ask atonement of thee for my son.”

 

“Then shall my wrath come home to some of thy kin,” says Illugi. And withal after the Thing was Illugi at most times very sad.

 

Tells the tale how this autumn Illugi rode from Gilsbank with thirty men, and came to Mossfell early in the morning. Then Onund got into the church with his sons, and took sanctuary; but Illugi caught two of his kin, one called Biorn and the other Thorgrim, and had Biorn slain, but the feet smitten from Thorgrim. And thereafter Illugi rode home, and there was no righting of this for Onund.

 

Hermund, Illugi’s son, had little joy after the death of Gunnlaug his brother, and deemed he was none the more avenged even though this had been wrought.

Now there was a man called Raven, brother’s son to Onund of Mossfell; he was a great sea-farer, and had a ship that lay up in Ramfirth: and in the spring Hermund Illugison rode from home alone north over Holt-beacon Heath, even to Ramfirth, and out as far as Board-ere to the ship of the chapmen. The chapmen were then nearly ready for sea; Raven, the ship-master, was on shore, and many men with him; Hermund rode up to him, and thrust him through with his spear, and rode away forthwith: but all Raven’s men were bewildered at seeing Hermund.

 

No atonement came for this slaying, and therewith ended the dealings of Illugi the Black and Onund of Mossfell.

 

 

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

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A percentage of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to UNICEF.

 

The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm Tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XVI How the two Foes met and fought at Dingness

But on a day in spring Gunnlaug was walking abroad, and his kinsman Thorkel with him; they walked away from the town, till on the meads. before them they saw a ring of men, and in that ring were two men with weapons fencing; but one was named Raven, the other Gunnlaug, while they who stood by said that Icelanders smote light, and were slow to remember their words.

 

Gunnlaug saw the great mocking hereunder, and much jeering was brought into the play; and withal he went away silent.

 

So a little while after he said to the earl that he had no mind to bear any longer the jeers and mocks of his courtiers about his dealings with Raven, and therewith he prayed the earl to give him a guide to Lifangr: now before this the earl had been told that Raven had left Lifangr and gone east to Sweden; therefore, he granted Gunnlaug leave to go, and gave him two guides for the journey.

 

Now Gunnlaug went from Hladir with six men to Lifangr; and, on the morning of the very day whereas Gunnlaug came in in the evening, Raven had left Lifangr with four men. Thence Gunnlaug went to Vera-dale, and came always in the evening to where Raven had been the night before.

 

So Gunnlaug went on till he came to the uppermost farm in the valley, called Sula, wherefrom had Raven fared in the morning; there he stayed not his journey, but kept on his way through the night.

 

Then in the morning at sun-rise they saw one another. Raven had got to a place where were two waters, and between them flat meads, and they are called Gleipni’s meads: but into one water stretched a little ness called Dingness. There on the ness Raven and his fellows, five together, took their stand. With Raven were his kinsmen, Grim and Olaf.

 

Now when they met, Gunnlaug said, “It is well that we have found one another.”

 

Raven said that he had nought to quarrel with therein;

“But now,” says he, “thou mayest choose as thou wilt, either that we fight alone together, or that we fight all of us man to man.”

 

Gunnlaug said that either way seemed good to him.

 

Then spake Raven’s kinsmen, Grim and Olaf, and said that they would little like to stand by and look on the fight, and in like wise spake Thorkel the Black, the kinsman of Gunnlaug.

Then said Gunnlaug to the earl’s guides, “Ye shall sit by and aid neither side, and be here to tell of our meeting;” and so they did.

 

So they set on, and fought dauntlessly, all of them. Grim and Olaf went both against Gunnlaug alone, and so closed their dealings with him that Gunnlaug slew them both and got no wound. This proves Thord Kolbeinson in a song that he made on Gunnlaug the Wormtongue:—

 

“Grim and Olaf great-hearts

In Gondul’s din, with thin sword

First did Gunnlaug fell there

Ere at Raven fared he;

Bold, with blood be-drifted

Bane of three the thane was;

War-lord of the wave-horse

Wrought for men folks’ slaughter.”

 

 

Meanwhile Raven and Thorkel the Black, Gunnlaug’s kinsman, fought until Thorkel fell before Raven and lost his life; and so at last all their fellowship fell. Then they two alone fought together with fierce onsets and mighty strokes, which they dealt each the other, falling on furiously without stop or stay.

 

Gunnlaug had the sword Ethelred’s-gift, and that was the best of weapons. At last Gunnlaug dealt a mighty blow at Raven, and cut his leg from under him; but none the more did Raven fall, but swung round up to a tree-stem, whereat he steadied the stump.

 

Then said Gunnlaug, “Now thou art no more meet for battle, nor will I fight with thee any longer, a maimed man.”

 

Raven answered: “So it is,” said he, “that my lot is now all the worser lot, but it were well with me yet, might I but drink somewhat.”

 

Gunnlaug said, “Bewray me not if I bring thee water in my helm.”

 

“I will not bewray thee,” said Raven. Then went Gunnlaug to a brook and fetched water in his helm, and brought it to Raven; but Raven stretched forth his left hand to take it, but with his right hand drave his sword into Gunnlaug’s head, and that was a mighty great wound.

 

Then Gunnlaug said, “Evilly hast thou beguiled me, and done traitorously wherein I trusted thee.”

 

Raven answers, “Thou sayest sooth, but this brought me to it, that I begrudged thee to lie in the bosom of Helga the Fair.”

 

Thereat they fought on, recking of nought; but the end of it was that Gunnlaug overcame Raven, and there Raven lost his life.

 

Then the earl’s guides came forward and bound the head-wound of Gunnlaug, and in meanwhile, he sat and sang:—

“O thou sword-storm stirrer,

Raven, stem of battle

Famous, fared against me

Fiercely in the spear din.

Many a flight of metal

Was borne on me this morning,

By the spear-walls’ builder,

Ring-bearer, on hard Dingness.”

 

After that they buried the dead, and got Gunnlaug on to his horse thereafter, and brought him right down to Lifangr. There he lay three nights, and got all his rights of a priest, and died thereafter, and was buried at the church there.

 

All men thought it great scathe of both of these men, Gunnlaug and Raven, amid such deeds as they died.

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

Download this saga as a PDF ebook from: http://www.abelapublishing.com/gunnlaug.html

 

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The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm Tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XV – How Gunnlaug and Raven agreed to go East to Norway, to try the matter again.

 

Now after these things were gone by men rode home from the Thing, and Gunnlaug dwelt at home at Gilsbank.

 

On a morning when he awoke all men had risen up, but he alone still lay abed; he lay in a shut-bed behind the seats. Now into the hall came twelve men, all full armed, and who should be there but Raven, Onund’s son; Gunnlaug sprang up forthwith, and got to his weapons.

 

But Raven spake, “Thou art in risk of no hurt this time,” quoth he, “but my errand hither is what thou shalt now hear: Thou didst call me to a holmgang last summer at the Althing, and thou didst not deem matters to be fairly tried therein; now I will offer thee this, that we both fare away from Iceland, and go abroad next summer, and go on holm in Norway, for there our kinsmen are not like to stand in our way.”

 

Gunnlaug answered, “Hail to thy words, stoutest of men! this thine offer I take gladly; and here, Raven, mayest thou have cheer as good as thou mayest desire.”

 

“It is well offered,” said Raven, “but this time we shall first have to ride away.” Thereon they parted.

 

Now the kinsmen of both sore misliked them of this, but could in no wise undo it, because of the wrath of Gunnlaug and Raven; and, after all, that must betide that drew towards.

 

Now it is to be said of Raven that he fitted out his ship in Leiruvag; two men are named that went with him, sisters’ sons of his father Onund, one hight Grim, the other Olaf, doughty men both. All the kinsmen of Raven thought it great scathe when he went away, but he said he had challenged Gunnlaug to the holmgang because he could have no joy soever of Helga; and he said, withal, that one must fall before the other.

 

So Raven put to sea, when he had wind at will, and brought his ship to Thrandheim, and was there that winter and heard nought of Gunnlaug that winter through; there lie abode him the summer following: and still another winter was he in Thrandheim, at a place called Lifangr.

 

Gunnlaug Worm-tongue took ship with Hallfred Troublous-Skald, in the north at The Plain; they were very late ready for sea.

 

They sailed into the main when they had a fair wind, and made Orkney a little before the winter. Earl Sigurd Lodverson was still lord over the isles, and Gunnlaug went to him and abode there that winter, and the earl held him of much account.

 

In the spring the earl would go on warfare, and Gunnlaug made ready to go with him; and that summer they harried wide about the South-isles and Scotland’s firths, and had many fights, and Gunnlaug always showed himself the bravest and doughtiest of fellows, and the hardiest of men wherever they came.

 

Earl Sigurd went back home early in the summer, but Gurmlaug took ship with chapmen, sailing for Norway, and he and Earl Sigurd parted in great friendship.

Gunnlaug fared north to Thrandheim, to Hladir, to see Earl Eric, and dwelt there through the early winter; the earl welcomed him gladly, and made offer to Gunnlaug to stay with him, and Gunnlaug agreed thereto.

 

The earl had heard already how all had befallen between Gunnlaug and Raven, and he told Gunnlaug that he laid ban on their fighting within his realm; Gunnlaug said the earl should be free to have his will herein.

 

So Gunnlaug abode there the winter through, ever heavy of mood.

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

Download this saga as a PDF ebook from: http://www.abelapublishing.com/gunnlaug.html

 

A percentage of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to UNICEF.

 

The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm-Tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XIV – Of the Holmgang at the Althing

Now in summer men ride a very many to the Althing: Illugi the Blacky and his sons with him, Gunnlaug and Hermund; Thorstein Egilson and Kolsvein his son; Onund, of Mossfell, and his sons all, and Sverting, Hafr-Biorn’s son. Skapti yet held the spokesmanship-at-law.

One day at the Thing, as men went thronging to the Hill of Laws, and when the matters of the law were done there, then Gunnlaug craved silence, and said:—

“Is Raven, the son of Onund, here?”

He said he was.

Then spake Gunnlaug, “Thou well knowest that thou hast got to wife my avowed bride, and thus hast thou made thyself my foe. Now for this I bid thee to holm here at the Thing, in the holm of the Axe-water, when three nights are gone by.”

Raven answers, “This is well bidden, as was to be looked for of thee, and for this I am ready, whenever thou wiliest it.”

Now the kin of each deemed this a very ill thing. But, at that time it was lawful for him who thought himself wronged by another to call him to fight on the holm.

So when three nights had gone by they got ready for the holmgang, and Illugi the Black followed his son thither with a great following. But Skapti, the lawman, followed Raven, and his father and other kinsmen of his.

Now before Gunnlaug went upon the holm he sang,—

“Out to isle ofeel-field

Dight am I to hie me:

Give, O God, thy singer

With glaive to end the striving.

Here shall I the head cleave

Of Helga’s love’s devourer,

At last my bright sword bringeth

Sundering of head and body.”

Then Raven answered and sang,—

“Thou, singer, knowest not surely

Which of us twain shall gain it;

With edge for leg-swathe eager,

Here are the wound-scythes bare now.

In whatso-wise we wound us,

The tidings from the Thing here,

And fame of thanes’ fair doings,

The fair young maid shall hear it.”

Hermund held shield for his brother, Gunnlaug; but Sverting, Hafr-Biorn’s son, was Raven’s shield-bearer. Whoso should be wounded was to ransom himself from the holm with three marks of silver.

Now, Raven’s part it was to deal the first blow, as he was the challenged man. He hewed at the upper part of Gunnlaug’s shield, and the sword brake asunder just beneath the hilt, with so great might he smote; but the point of the sword flew up from the shield and struck Gunnlaug’s cheek, whereby he got just grazed; with that their fathers ran in between them, and many other men.

“Now,” said Gunnlaug, “I call Raven overcome, as he is weaponless.”

“But I say that thou art vanquished, since thou art wounded,” said Raven.

Now, Gunnlaug was nigh mad, and very wrathful, and said it was not tried out yet.

Illugi, his father, said they should try no more for that time.

Gunnlaug said, “Beyond all things I desire that I might in such wise meet Raven again, that thou, father, wert not anigh to part us.”

And thereat they parted for that time, and all men went back to their booths.

But on the second day after this it was made law in the law-court that, henceforth, all holmgangs should be forbidden; and this was done by the counsel of all the wisest men that were at the Thing; and there, indeed, were all the men of most counsel in all the land. And this was the last holmgang fought in Iceland, this, wherein Gunnlaug and Raven fought.

But this Thing was the third most thronged Thing that has been held in Iceland; the first was after Njal’s burning, the second after the Heath-slaughters.

Now, one morning, as the brothers Hermund and Gunnlaug went to Axe-water to wash, on the other side went many women towards the river, and in that company was Helga the Fair. Then said Hermund,—

“Dost thou see thy friend Helga there on the other side of the river?”

“Surely, I see her,” says Gunnlaug, and withal he sang:—

“Born was she for men’s bickering:

Sore bale hath wrought the war-stemy

And I yearned ever madly

To hold that oak-tree golden.

To me then, me destroyer

Of swan-mead’s flame, unneedful

This looking on the dark-eyed,

This golden land’s beholding.”

Therewith they crossed the river, and Helga and Gunnlaug spake awhile together, and as the brothers crossed the river eastward back again, Helga stood and gazed long after Gunnlaug.

Then Gunnlaug looked back and sang:—

“Moon of linen-lapped one,

Leek-sea-bearing goddess,

Hawk-keen out of heaven

Shone all bright upon me;

But that eyelid’s moonbeam

Of gold-necklaced goddess

Her hath all undoing

Wrought, and me made nought of.”

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

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A percentage of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to UNICEF.

The Story of Gunnlaug the Worm-Tongue and Raven the Skald

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XIII – Of the Winter-Wedding at Skaney, and how Gunnlaug gave the Kings Cloak to Helga

Tells the tale of Raven, that he sat at his weddings-feast at Burg, and it was the talk of most men that the bride was but drooping; for true is the saw that saith, “Long we remember what youth gained us,” and even so it was with her now.

 

But this new thing befell at the feast, that Hungerd, the daughter of Thorod and Jofrid, was wooed by a man named Sverting, the son of Hafr-Biorn, the son of Mold-Gnup, and the wedding was to come off that winter after Yule, at Skaney, where dwelt Thorkel, a kinsman of Hungerd, and son of Torn Valbrandsson; and the mother of Torn was Thorodda, the sister of Odd of the Tongue.

 

Now Raven went home to Mossfell with Helga his wife. When they had been there a little while, one morning early before they rose up, Helga was awake, but Raven slept, and fared ill in his sleep. And when he woke Helga asked him what he had dreamt. Then Raven sang:—

 

“In thine arms, so dreamed I,

Hewn was I, gold island!

Bride, in blood I bled there,

Bed of thine was reddened.

Never more then mightst thou,

Mead-bowl’spourer speedy,

Bind my gashes bloody—

Lind-leek-bough thou likst it.”

 

 

Helga spake: “Never shall I weep therefor,” quoth she; “ye have evilly beguiled me, and Gunnlaug has surely come out.” And therewith she wept much.

 

But, a little after, Gunnlaug’s coming was bruited about, and Helga became so hard with Raven, that he could not keep her at home at Mossfell; so that back they had to go to Burg, and Raven got small share of her company.

 

Now men get ready for the winter-wedding. Thorkel of Skaney bade Illugi the Black and his sons. But when master Illugi got ready, Gunnlaug sat in the hall, and stirred not to go. Illugi went up to him and said, “Why dost thou not get ready, kinsman?”

Gunnlaug answered, “I have no mind to go.”

Says Illugi, “Nay, but certes thou shalt go, kinsman,” says he; “and cast thou not grief over thee by yearning for one woman. Make as if thou knewest nought of it, for women thou wilt never lack.”

 

Now Gunnlaug did as his father bade him; so they came to the wedding, and Illugi and his sons were set down in the high seat; but Thorstein Egilson, and Raven his son-in-law, and the bridegroom’s following, were set in the other high seat, over against Illugi.

The women sat on the dais, and Helga the Fair sat next to the bride. Oft she turned her eyes on Gunnlaug, thereby proving the saw, “Eyes will bewray if maid love man.”

 

 

Gunnlaug was well arrayed, and had on him that goodly raiment that King Sigtrygg had given him; and now he was thought far above all other men, because of many things, both strength, and goodliness, and growth.

 

There was little mirth among folk at this wedding. But on the day when all men were making ready to go away the women stood up and got ready to go home. Then went Gunnlaug to talk to Helga, and long they talked together: but Gunnlaug sang:—

 

“Light-heart lived the Worm-tongue

All day long no longer

In mountain-home, since Helga

Had name of wife of Raven;

Nought foresaw thy father,

Hardener white of fight-thaw,

What my words should come to.

—The maid to gold was wedded.”

 

 

And again he sang:—

“Worst reward I owe them,

Father thine, O wine-may,

And mother, that they made thee

So fair beneath thy maid-gear;

For thou, sweet field of sea-flame,

All joy hast slain within me.—

Lo, here, take it, loveliest

E’er made of lord and lady!”

 

 

And therewith Gunnlaug gave Helga the cloak, Ethelred’s-gift, which was the fairest of things, and she thanked him well for the gift.

 

Then Gunnlaug went out, and by that time riding-horses had been brought home and saddled, and among them were many very good ones; and they were all tied up in the road. Gunnlaug leaps on to a horse, and rides a hand-gallop along the homefield up to a place where Raven happened to stand just before him; and Raven had to draw out of his way.

 

Then Gunnlaug said,—

“No need to slink aback, Raven, for I threaten thee nought as at this time; but thou knowest forsooth, what thou hast earned.”.

Raven answered and sang,—

 

“God of wound-flamed glitter,

Glorier of fight-goddess,

Must we fall a-fighting

For fairest kirtle-bearer?

Death-staffs many such-like

Fair as she is are there

In south-lands o’er the sea floods.

Sooth saith he who knoweth.”

 

 

“Maybe there are many such, but they do not seem so to me,” said Gunnlaug.

Therewith Illugi and Thorstein ran up to them, and would not have them fight.

Then Gunnlaug sang,—

 

“The fair-hued golden goddess

For gold to Raven sold they,

(Raven my match as men say)

While the mighty isle-king,

Ethelred, in England

From eastward way delayed me,

Wherefore to gold-waster

Waneth tongue’s speech-hunger.”

 

Hereafter both rode home, and all was quiet and tidingless that winter through; but Raven had nought of Helga’s fellowship after her meeting with Gunnlaug.

 

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

Download this saga as a PDF ebook from: http://www.abelapublishing.com/gunnlaug.html

 

A percentage of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to UNICEF.

 

The Story of Gunnlaug the Worm Tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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THE SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD – CHAPTER XII – Of Gunnlaug’s landing, and how he found Helga wedded to Raven

They made land north by Fox-Plain, in Hraunhaven, half a month before winter, and there unshipped their goods. Now there was a man called Thord, a bonder’s son of the Plain, there. He fell to wrestling with the chapmen, and they mostly got worsted at his hands.

 

Then a wrestling was settled between him and Gunnlaug. The night before Thord made vows to Thor for the victory; but the next day, when they met, they fell-to wrestling. Then Gunnlaug tripped both feet from under Thord, and gave him a. great fall; but the foot that Gunnlaug stood on was put out of joint, and Gunnlaug fell together with Thord.

 

Then said Thord, “Maybe that other things go no better for thee.”

 

“What then?” says Gunnlaug.

 

“Thy dealings with Raven, if he wed Helga the Fair at winter-nights. I was anigh at the Thing when that was settled last summer.”

 

Gunnlaug answered naught thereto.

 

Now the foot was swathed, and put into joint again, and it swelled mightily; but he and Hallfred ride twelve in company till they come to Gilsbank, in Burg-firth, the very Saturday night when folk sat at the wedding at Burg. Illugi was fain of his son Gunnlaug and his fellows; but Gunnlaug said he would ride then and there down to Burg. Illugi said it was not wise to do so, and to all but Gunnlaug that seemed good. But Gunnlaug was then unfit to walk, because of his foot, though he would not let that be seen. Therefore there was no faring to Burg.

 

On the morrow Hallfred rode to Hreda-water, in North-water dale, where Galti, his brother and a brisk man, managed their matters.

 

———————-

From: THE STORY/SAGA OF GUNNLAUG THE WORM-TONGUE AND RAVEN THE SKALD

Translated From The Icelandic EIRIKR MAGNUSSON & WILLIAM MORRIS

 

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The Saga of Gunnlaug the Worm-tongue and Raven the Skald

 

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